Air-sea gas exchange

The transport of gases between the ocean and atmosphere has profound implications for our environment and the Earth's climate. There are many complex processes involved in air-sea gas exchange and understanding them is critical to future climate change scenarios.

The Air-Sea Exchange (ASE) group focuses on the processes that control gas and particle exchange between the ocean and atmosphere.

Air-sea exchange is important for the cycling of gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, dimethylsulfide and ammonia. These compounds are important for our climate because they are either greenhouse gases or influence the production and growth of particles in the atmosphere that reflect solar radiation away from the Earth’s surface.

We also study the air-sea exchange processes relevant to ozone, particles and volatile organic compounds, all of which are relevant to our understanding of how the ocean influences atmospheric processing and air pollution.

We established the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory, an ideal platform for us to study the interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere.

Our big research questions are:

  • What are the processes at the ocean/atmosphere interface that control the air-sea transfer of gases and particles?
  • What are the key biological and chemical processes in the surface ocean that control the concentrations of climate- and pollution-relevant trace gases?
  • How are the atmospheric emissions from ships and the regulation of these emissions influencing the marine environment?

     

Making a difference

Our work helps to improve understanding of the role that the oceans play in the Earth system. Our data is used within models to understand how the air-sea fluxes of gases might change in response to various future scenarios including changes in marine biota, ocean acidification, warming and other stressors. 
 

Further information

Please feel free to contact Dr Tom Bell or other members of the group if you are interested in working or studying within the group.

 

Events

PML is hosting the 8th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces, 19-20 May 2020. See https://www.pml.ac.uk/GTWS2020 for further information.

Projects

PICCOLO

Processes Influencing Carbon Cycling: Observations of the Lower limb of the Antarctic Overturning (PICCOLO)

Contact: Dr Tom Bell

The vast, remote seas which surround the continent of Antarctica are collectively known as the Southern Ocean. This region with its severe...

North Atlantic climate system integrated study (ACSIS)

North Atlantic climate system integrated study (ACSIS)

Contact: Dr Ming-Xi Yang

Major changes are occurring across the North Atlantic climate system: in ocean and atmosphere temperatures and circulation, in sea ice thickness...

Ocean Regulation of Climate through Heat and Carbon Sequestration and Transports (ORCHESTRA)

Ocean Regulation of Climate through Heat and Carbon Sequestration and Transports (ORCHESTRA)

Contact: Dr Tim Smyth

Climate change is one of the most urgent issues facing humanity and life on Earth. Better predictions of future climate change are needed, so that...

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International gas transfer meeting

Related recent publications

  1. Dixon, JL; Hopkins, FR; Stephens, JA; Schäfer, H. 2020 Seasonal Changes in Microbial Dissolved Organic Sulfur Transformations in Coastal Waters. Microorganisms, 8 (3). 337. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8030337
    View publication

  2. Shutler, JD; Wanninkhof, R; Nightingale, PD; Woolf, DK; Bakker, DCE; Watson, A; Ashton, I; Holding, T; Chapron, B; Quilfen, Y; Fairall, C; Schuster, U; Nakajima, M; Donlon, CJ. 2019 Satellites will address critical science priorities for quantifying ocean carbon. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 9, pp. https://doi.org/10.1002/fee.2129
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  3. Kitidis, V; Shutler, JD; Ashton, I; Warren, M; Brown, IJ; Findlay, HS; Hartman, SE; Sanders, R; Humphreys, M; Kivimäe, C; Greenwood, N; Hull, T; Pearce, D; McGrath, T; Stewart, BM; Walsham, P; McGovern, E; Bozec, Y; Gac, J-P; van Heuven, SMAC; Hoppema, M; Schuster, U; Johannessen, T; Omar, A; Lauvset, SK; Skjelvan, I; Olsen, A; Steinhoff, T; Körtzinger, A; Becker, M; Lefevre, N; Diverrès, D; Gkritzalis, T; Cattrijsse, A; Petersen, W; Voynova, YG; Chapron, B; Grouazel, A; Land, PE; Sharples, J; Nightingale, PD. 2019 Winter weather controls net influx of atmospheric CO2 on the north-west European shelf. Scientific Reports, 9 (1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-56363-5
    View publication

  4. Woolf, DK; Shutler, JD; Goddijn‐Murphy, L; Watson, AJ; Chapron, B; Nightingale, PD; Donlon, CJ; Piskozub, J; Yelland, MJ; Ashton, I; Holding, T; Schuster, U; Girard‐Ardhuin, F; Grouazel, A; Piolle, JF; Warren, M; Wrobel‐Niedzwiecka, I; Land, PE; Torres, R; Prytherch, J; Moat, B; Hanafin, J; Ardhuin, F; Paul, F. 2019 Key Uncertainties in the Recent Air‐Sea Flux of CO 2. Global Biogeochemical Cycles. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GB006041
    View publication

  5. Holding, T; Ashton, IG; Shutler, JD; Land, PE; Nightingale, PD; Rees, AP; Brown, IJ; Piolle, JF; Kock, A; Bange, HW; Woolf, DK; Goddijn-Murphy, L; Pereira, R; Paul, F; Girand-Ardhuin, F; Chapron, B; Rehder, G; Ardhuin, F; Donlon, CJ. 2019 The FluxEngine air-sea gas flux toolbox: simplified interface and extensions for in situ analyses and multiple sparingly soluble gases. Ocean Science Discussions. 1-28. https://doi.org/10.5194/os-2019-45 (Submitted)
    View publication

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