Sea foam

Why does the sea foam?

 

What made you choose Marine Science as a career? What inspired you? These questions were addressed by European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA) during its second conference held in Plymouth earlier this month.

What made you choose Marine Science as a career? What inspired you? These questions were addressed by European Marine Science Educators Association (EMSEA) during its second conference held in Plymouth earlier this month. The aim was to instigate a discussion on how the scientific community could influence future generations of marine scientists. During which conversations focused on different ways to present marine science to school children and to promote the inclusion of the topic in the curriculum of compulsory education both in EU countries and the US.
 
PML's Dr Victor Martinez Vicente became involved in this conference through his participation in the project - ISECA (Information System on Eutrophication of our Coastal Areas). ISECA combines earth observation with modelling and in-situ data to assess coastal 'eutrophication'. This is one of the main causes of the deterioration of water quality, from the overload of nitrogen, phosphorus and other organic material. It can result in a series of 'side effects' such as foam or a green tide on the beach. In the North Sea and the English Channel, this is mainly due to human activities. The aim of ISECA is to provide tools to stakeholders and raise awareness of this phenomenon with the public at large.
 
As a part of the outreach component of PML’s activities within ISECA, PML’s Dr Martinez Vicente gave a talk with Ms. Elise Chiroutre (Nausicaá Aquarium, France) at the conference focusing on the outreach activities in the project and the use of earth observation to monitor the marine environment. PML also had a stand with Nausicaá where a short video was shown briefly explaining the cause and effects of eutrophication (you can watch the video here). PML is now looking at hosting a public event on the use and opportunities of earth observation during the upcoming World Space Week 2013 in October.
 
“Personally, I found the experience very rewarding as it brought to focus the wider implications of my day-to-day activities at PML, and reminded me why I chose Marine Science” commented Dr Martinez Vicente.

Other recent news articles

News

Continued research detects mega-blooms

Marine science research has not escaped the impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic and scientists have had to be particularly innovative at finding ways to continue research, while adhering rigorously to Government Guidelines. Laboratories have been closed, or at least highly restr...

News

Understanding the chemical language of plants and seaweeds under climate change

A new paper highlights a ‘missing’ link and novel aspect of studying plant and seaweed responses to climate change by considering the chemical communication of plants and seaweeds with their associated complex communities of microbes.

News

Meet the New Buoy

It took three lorries to deliver the tower, floats and other parts of Plymouth Marine Laboratory’s new Autonomous Data Buoy; the buoy is a vastly upgraded replacement for the current L4 buoy, moored out in the Western Channel off the South Devon Coast.