MOOCs

PML scientists share Earth Observation expertise in new MOOCs

 

PML scientists have recently been involved in two ‘MOOCs’ – Massive, Open, Online Courses – sharing their expertise in the field of Earth Observation.

A recent course funded by the European Space Agency, ESA, explored the themes of optical Earth Observation, a tool PML scientists are utilising to study inland and coastal water quality, climate, carbon, and fisheries. Scientists were able to interact with course participants, who asked many questions about the data and how it was used (to register your interest in the next series of this course please click here).

A second course, due to start on the 24th of October, features PML scientists discussing a wide range of techniques for monitoring the oceans from space, and how these scientific methods can be used for applications relevant to society.

This course, funded by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and in support of the EU Copernicus programme, features topics including climate change, tropical storms, El Niño, algal blooms, carbon, biodiversity, and socioeconomics. Interactive elements will show participants how they can access the vast array of satellite data available through the EU Copernicus programme, to learn more about our oceans.

The course was produced by Imperative Space, in collaboration with many other UK and European partners, as well as NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It is free of charge and suitable for anyone with an interest in the oceans or remote sensing. Visit Futurelearn to register. 

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