Leading international researcher awarded fellowship to work at PML

Leading international researcher awarded fellowship to work at PML

Dr Rafael Rasse (left) and Dr Giorgio Dall’Olmo (right).

 

This week Dr Rafael Rasse was awarded a prestigious Royal Society Newton International Fellowship to the value of approximately £100,000, to undertake research at PML in collaboration with Dr Giorgio Dall’Olmo on "Autonomous observations of oceanic carbon fluxes in oxygen minimum zones" using data from Bio-Argo floats.

Dr Rasse first began collaborating with Dr Dall’Olmo in 2014, when funded by the Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans (POGO) as a Fellow, on board the Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) research cruise. During AMT24 the scientists focused on improving bio-optical models to estimate particulate organic carbon and deployed multiple Bio-Argo floats.

Dr. Rasse commented:

"My collaboration with Dr. Dall’Olmo made me understand the enormous potential that bio-optical measurements collected by autonomous platforms have to improve current estimations of oceanic carbon fluxes, particularly in unexplored oxygen minimum zones.”

The eighth round of Newton International Fellowships has been awarded jointly by three of the UK’s national research academies – the Royal Society, the British Academy and the Academy of Medical Sciences. The Newton International Fellowships are funded by the UK Government’s Department for Business Innovation and Skills to ensure that the UK engages with the world’s most promising early career academics.

The Fellowships provide an opportunity for some of the most talented post-doctoral researchers working overseas to carry out world class research in UK institutions such as PML. The Newton Fund initiative aims to develop long-term sustainable growth and welfare of partner countries through building research and innovation capacity, and forms part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance commitment.

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